Myths & Facts

Hospice care is about helping patients live each day of their lives to the fullest extent possible, and providing support to both patients and families. When making a decision about hospice care, it helps to have a good understanding of what hospice is, and what it isn’t. Here are some of the most common misconceptions about hospice, along with the true facts about this special kind of care    

MYTH: HOSPICE MEANS THAT THE PATIENT WILL SOON DIE

Fact: Receiving hospice care does not mean giving up hope or that death is imminent. The earlier an individual receives hospice care, the more opportunity there is to stabilize your medical condition and address other needs. Some patients actually improve and may be discharged from hospice care.

MYTH: HOSPICE IS A PLACE

Fact: Hospice care usually takes place in the comfort of your home, but can be provided in any environment in which you live, including nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and residential care facilities.

MYTH: FAMILIES HAVE TO PAY FOR HOSPICE CARE

Fact: Coverage for Hospice is widely available. It is provided by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurance. Patients and families may contact Continuum Care Hospice 24 hours a day 7 days a week to review coverage options.

MYTH: PATIENTS HAVE TO GIVE UP THEIR OWN DOCTOR

Fact: Patients may keep their own physician, who will work closely with the Affinity Care Hospice Medical Director to plan and carry out care.

MYTH: HOSPICE IS ONLY FOR CANCER PATIENTS

Fact: A large number of hospice patients have congestive heart failure, dementia, chronic lung disease, or other conditions.

MYTH: PATIENTS CAN ONLY RECEIVE HOSPICE CARE FOR A LIMITED AMOUNT OF TIME

Fact: The Medicare benefit, and most private insurance, pays for hospice care as long as the patient continues to meets the criteria necessary. Patients may come on and off hospice care, and re-enroll in hospice care, as needed.

MYTH: HOSPICE IS JUST FOR THE PATIENT.

Fact: Hospice focuses on comfort, dignity, and emotional support. The quality of life for the patient, but also family members and others who are caregivers, is the highest priority.

God gave burdens, he also gave shoulders.-- Yiddish Proverbs